Review : Call Of The Yeti

Review : Call Of The Yeti

Call of the Yeti has the potential to be treated as a classic of modern fiction for several reasons, first being its hero. It gives us the hero of our times. Nobody can be a hero in these thoroughly finished times. Siva is a hero because he makes no attempt to be a hero. Unlike all other heroes in English fiction, heroism is thrust on him by these very finished times. It seems that the very times churn out this hero from the whirlpool of time and events. After reading the fiction, I irresistibly, cried out- here is the hero of our times!

Its style, expression and language are so honest and truthful that in spite of the declaration in the beginning that it is entirely a work of fiction, the reader feels impelled to say – if it is fiction, it is fiction that is truer than facts. It has the power to transform itself into becoming the truth of future. It reads like a page from the secret book of the Creator.

It takes up hopeless situations and creates hope in the heart of the readers. It gives a firm hope that Tibet shall be free. Nothing can stop it. The very forceful way it ends makes the reader realize that such powerful emotions that it arouses cannot end without achieving freedom for Tibet. Those powerful yearnings and forces that it leaves raw and unspent have the natural momentum and the power of times that will take them to the freedom of Tibet. They cannot have any other end.

The story is itself a powerful flow of the stream of time that unites all the sub-plots, i.e. its rivulets, towards an unfinished end and beyond it to Tibet’s freedom. I am not aware of any modern fiction that resembles it in any of its branches, like story line, interesting events, fact, mystery and miracle. It is a charisma woven by human deeds, dreams and the moving finger of truth together. It seems to be a work in creating which the human and the divine elements have collaborated.

I hope the publisher, who is known for his advertising skills, will spread it all over the English knowing world and will send it to compete for top literary prizes of the world. I don’t think any independent selection board can deny it any literary prize known to the modern literary world, like Booker, Pulitzer or any prize that is considered the highest.

It is a story that makes the experience of love available to the reader, instead of making him believe that it is a story of love. As the reader goes through it, love starts affecting him, as the magic that it is. By achieving this aim of love in fiction, Nirmal Kumar’s fiction has accomplished what, to my knowledge, no modern fiction has accomplished. Most of modern fiction writers help the reader to develop an attitude towards love, instead of acquainting him with the wonderful thing that love is. They help the readers to develop a supercilious attitude towards love, as if love is a false, pretentious, imaginary or make-believe emotion, not a real human emotion that can happen to sensible people in the modern world. The writer belongs to the class of the Great Russian writers of love – Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.

For several decades past, fiction writers have been consigning true love between man and woman, which transcends death and travels beyond the grave, to the realm of unreality. In such a cynical literary ambience, to make true love a literary experience with its live-throbs, effortlessly, requires either divine intervention or a pre-sentiment of nirvana. And this is what I want to tell the prospective reader that “Call of the Yeti” has it.

To push human experience of truth beyond the current impasse has been the rare privilege of literary men. W B Yeats had counted it as the only achievement for which he might be remembered. Only those very few writers who have crossed an abyss or gap that divided human consciousness of the mundane from the consciousness of ‘the unknown’ know what a Herculean task it is. Had this novelist done nothing more than leaping across this abyss, I am sure the angel that records rare human achievements would have given the name ‘Nirmal Kumar’ a place in his book.

However, ‘Call of the Yeti’ is a tale of many more splendours. Another great feat is the simplicity with which the core of Buddhism and the profound truths taught by the Buddha have been handled and made accessible to the reader, not as ideas, but emotions that energize the readers’ little human self, which stands baffled by the constant threat of a terrible death at the hands of terrorism.

The soul of beautiful prose that does not let sentiments turn into sentimentality is evident throughout the novel. I sincerely hope that one who reads it will not ask to be told why Keats said ‘truth is beauty and beauty truth’, and why ‘this is all that ye know on earth and all that ye need to know’.

“Call of the Yeti” is not a novel, but an epic of the human heart, and of its struggle of uncoiling the Kundalini of mankind.
It is poetic, panoramic, profound and prophetic. All enquiring minds will behold the fruits of their search in this novel.
Nirmal, indeed, asserts the perennial proclamation:
Satyameve Jayate na Anritam (Truth alone prevails, not untruth)

This sage, Nirmal, resurrects the assertive intervention:
Sambhavami yugeyuge (In all ages I will appear again and again).
He is both bold and benevolent when he tears the spurious away from the genuine. The sublime survives, the mighty bites the dust. Life triumphs over death; humanity over barbarity. Tibet is our testament of Truth. Let us wait for more from the Messiah Nirmal, who rescues our faith and our hope. Future speaks through him: The dawn is at hand! Arise! Awake! Fear not! Thou art immortal! Victory is thy Fate! Failure is not an option with thee!”

“Call of the Yeti” is not a novel, but an epic of the human heart, and of its struggle of uncoiling the Kundalini of mankind.
It is poetic, panoramic, profound and prophetic. All enquiring minds will behold the fruits of their search in this novel.
Nirmal, indeed, asserts the perennial proclamation:
Satyameve Jayate na Anritam (Truth alone prevails, not untruth)

This sage, Nirmal, resurrects the assertive intervention:
Sambhavami yugeyuge (In all ages I will appear again and again).
He is both bold and benevolent when he tears the spurious away from the genuine. The sublime survives, the mighty bites the dust. Life triumphs over death; humanity over barbarity. Tibet is our testament of Truth. Let us wait for more from the Messiah Nirmal, who rescues our faith and our hope. Future speaks through him: The dawn is at hand! Arise! Awake! Fear not! Thou art immortal! Victory is thy Fate! Failure is not an option with thee!”